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Voter Registration Maps

District breakdown: Arizona’s Congressional District Two

Voter Registration Maps By February 5, 2020 Tags: , , , No Comments

Here is an interactive map showing the distribution of voters by political party in each of the 195 voting precincts that make up Arizona’s Congressional District Two (CD 2), currently held by Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick. According to data from the Pima and Cochise County Recorder’s Offices, 423,554 voters are presently registered in the district.

Democrats hold a voter registration advantage of about 2.4 percent in CD 2. Of its 423,554 voters, 142,640 are Republicans, or about 33.7 percent. 152,890 are Democrats, or about 36.1 percent. The remaining 128,024 voters, the vast majority of which do not state a party affiliation, make up about 30.2 percent.

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Demystifying Pima County’s justice precincts

Voter Registration Maps By February 3, 2020 No Comments

I’ve been asked by a number of people where a good map of Pima County’s justice precincts can be found. These are the political districts that elect justices of the peace and constables. The county’s web-based GIS map viewer, PimaMaps, has a layer for this. But the information in it is sparse, and casual users may find PimaMaps difficult to navigate. So I made a map I hope folks will find more instructive and easier to use.

This is a color-coded “choropleth” map that uses shades of red and blue to indicate voter registration advantage in each precinct.  It is similar to maps I have recently made of Arizona’s congressional and legislative districts. If you hover your mouse over a precinct, the map will display the current justice of the peace and constable serving there, plus detailed information about voter registration in that precinct.

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District breakdown: Pima County Supervisor District One

Voter Registration Maps By January 23, 2020 Tags: , No Comments

Here is an interactive map showing the distribution of voters by political party in each of the 58 voting precincts that make up Pima County’s Supervisor District One, currently held by Supervisor Ally Miller. According to the Pima County Recorder’s website, 143,593 voters are presently registered in the district. According to Pima County’s official election results, about 74 percent of District One voters voted in its last election in 2016, in which Miller, a Republican, defeated Democrat Brian Bickel by a margin of about 8.6 percent.

Republicans hold a voter registration advantage of about five percent in District One. Of its 143,593 voters, 53,975 are Republicans, or about 37.6 percent. 46,808 are Democrats, or about 32.6 percent. The remaining 41,590 voters, the vast majority of which do not state a party affiliation, make up about 29 percent.

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Partisan advantage in Arizona’s legislative districts

Voter Registration Maps By January 21, 2020 Tags: , , No Comments

Here is an interactive map that shows the distribution of political party affiliations in Arizona’s 30 legislative districts. If you hover over a district, the map will display the district number, plus statistics about which voters live in that district. It also shows the current senators and representatives for each district. (Each has one senator and two reps.) You can zoom in on the map for greater detail.

This is a choropleth map, which is to say it uses differences in color to indicate a varying quantity. Democrat-leaning districts are shaded in blue according to their degree of advantage. Republican leaning districts, similarly, are shaded in red.

Republicans hold some degree of advantage in 18 of Arizona’s 30 districts. In these 18 districts, Republicans hold all but one senate seat. Democrat Sean Bowie is the senator for District 18, which leans Republican by 2.7 percent. Democrats hold four house seats in Republican leaning districts: LD 18’s Mitzi Epstein and Jennifer Jermaine,  and LD 16’s Kelli Butler and Aaron Lieberman.

Democrats hold some degree of advantage in 12 of the 30 districts. In these, all senate seats and all house seats are held by Democrats.

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Partisan advantage in Maricopa County’s voting precincts

Voter Registration Maps By October 30, 2018 No Comments

Here is an interactive map that shows the distribution of political party affiliations in Maricopa County’s 748 voting precincts. If you hover your mouse over a county, the map will show that precinct’s name, the percentage it comprises of the Maricopa County electorate, and statistics about its voters and their party affiliations. You can zoom in on the map for greater detail.

The map also displays the city (or town), congressional district, and legislative district for each precinct.

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Partisan advantage in Arizona’s counties

Voter Registration Maps By October 26, 2018 Tags: , No Comments

Here is an interactive map that shows the distribution of political party affiliations in Arizona’s 15 counties. If you hover over a county, the map will show that county’s name, the percentage it comprises of the statewide electorate, and statistics about its voters and their party affiliations. You can zoom in on the map for greater detail.

Republicans hold some degree of advantage in eight of the 15 counties. Of these, Yavapai and Mohave counties are the most heavily Republican. Apache and Santa Cruz counties are the most heavily Democratic.

About 75 percent of Arizona’s population lives in its two largest counties: Maricopa County makes up about 60 percent of the state’s population, and Pima County makes up about another 15 percent. Maricopa leans Republican by 5.14 percent. Pima leans Democrat by 8.39 percent.

The pie chart below shows the share each county makes up of the statewide electorate. If you hover over a slice, the chart will show you the county’s name, its number of registered voters, and its share as a percentage.

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Partisan advantage in Arizona’s congressional districts

Voter Registration Maps By October 15, 2018 Tags: , , No Comments

Here is an interactive map that shows the distribution of political party affiliations in Arizona’s nine congressional districts. If you hover over a district, the map will display the district number, plus statistics about which voters live in that district. It also shows the current representative for each district. You can zoom in on the map for greater detail.

Democrats hold some degree of advantage in five of the nine districts. Of these five, two lean heavily in favor of Democrats: Ruben Gallego’s District Seven has a 31.6 percent advantage over Republicans, and Raúl Grijalva’s District Three has a 22.7 percent advantage.

The remaining three Democrat-leaning districts have far slimmer advantages. Tom O’Halleran’s District One leans Democratic by 5.5 percent, and Kyrsten Sinema’s District Nine leans Democratic by 3.3 percent. Martha McSally’s District Two is Arizona’s most competitive congressional district, with Dems holding an advantage of .9 percent.

Arizona has four solidly Republican congressional districts, each with a registration advantage of 15 points or more. David Schweikert’s District Six has a 15 percent advantage over Dems. Debbie Lesko’s District Eight has a 16.9 percent advantage. Andy Biggs’ District Five has a 21.2 percent advantage. And Paul Gosar’s District Four—Arizona’s most heavily GOP congressional district—has an advantage of 26.1 points.

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